REVIEWS

An infinity of Days in the Psychotic Atomik Empire

Norton flexes his literary muscles and takes on an impressive breadth of topics in these gritty, passionate tales. He turns genres inside out, has a hell of an ear for dialogue and knows how to tell a good story.

Dean Monti, author of The Sweep of the Second Hand

Greg Norton's stories resonate with the reader like the rumble of a glass-pack muffler off the hard Chicago streets many of his characters ply. Norton's alter ego, Peter MacNaughton, is one part Philip Marlowe and one part Joe Hill and real as the Hawk in January, no matter what situation he finds himself in. Guns, drugs, the down and out, union activists, and everyday people, Norton brings them all to life with amazing clarity. Great reading!

Jim Chandler, Editor, Thunder Sandwich, Author, Parallel Blues

Fast-paced and sometimes furious, these linked Chicago stories involve burnt-out radicals, women in flight, workers that get away with things while searching for self-respect. There a few old-style labor battles too, and for once the union rep actually wins an argument with the company guy. It's worth a read in times when even partial victories are hard to come by.

Greg Norton's fiction gives an accurate and vivid portrait of some of the most important currents of rebellion in working-class life. Very few writers today have a clue about this paramount question in American life. His novel There Ain't No Justice, Just Us and some of the stories in this collection, notably "Factory," open a vista of the possibilities of revolt for the working-class majority against the capitalist parasites. They are inspiring.

Tim Hall, Editor, Struggle Magazine

John Crawford, Editor, West End Press